Winter Solstice – Memories & More Celebration

What’s the meaning of winter solstice for you?

How did you celebrate it?

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Family Gathering Since Born

Every year’s Winter Solstice was my grandfather’s birthday, where we celebrated his birthday all my life till this year, he left the physical world. But, I honour this day to him. Thank you grandpa for birthing on this date which allows us to come home as family during Winter Solstice. I love you.

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For Chinese:

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We called it ‘Dong Zhi’ where we gather and eat glutinous balls, a part of the culture, especially in China to welcome winter. In Malaysia, we do not have winter yet I have this culture to gather as one important celebration since young.

This year, its different. I decided to ‘celebrate’ this day alone. Because I discovered the importance of Winter Solstice in many ancient cultures.

 

For Northern Hemisphere:

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It is the shortest day of the year, longest night of the year where the ancient pagan culture would call it ‘Yule Time’ (Norse god Odin; Goddess Moon energy) where they burn Yule logs for 12 days. Many celebrations in the Northern Hemisphere focus on this sacred time in Nature, when the promise of light and life returns. Yule is connected to the joy at the birth of the Sun God, child of the Goddess. It is a celebration of rebirth.

For Jewish:

Hannukah-2019-date-when-does-Hannukah-start-time-1218540It is the Hanukkah or Chanukah, the Festival of Light for 8 days, this year, Hannukah begins at sunset on Sunday, December 22 and runs until nightfall on Monday, December 30.. Each night, one additional candle is lit by the shamash until all eight candles are lit together on the final night of the festival. Families will get together and sing traditional songs, give gifts to children, eat and spin the dreidel.

For Iranian:

SHAB E YALDA 2017-TURMERICSAFFRONIts called Shab-e Yalda, an Iranian festival celebrated on the “longest and darkest night of the year”.  One of the most ancient Persian festivals annually celebrated on December 21,  Yalda means birth and it refers to the birth of Mitra; the mythological goddess of light. People gather in groups of friends or relatives usually at the home of grandparents or the elderly to pass the longest night of the year happily by eating nuts and fruits, reading Hafiz poems, making good wishes, and talking and laughing all together to give a warm welcome to winter, and a felicitous farewell to autumn.

For Native Americans, some tribes would celebrate as the beginning of the year.


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Winter Solstice

 

This is the time,

where we say goodbye to the old,

welcome the new.

Where Sun returns to the Earth,

Life begins once more.

 

It is the celebration of the Light,

the rebirth of the Sun.

 

Time to renew our connection,

personal and with each other,

and spiritually connect to our ancestors.

 

Look within yourself,

focus on your intentions.

 

Light a candle,

keep lights off,

screens off,

embrace the darkness.

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Love, 

Mera

22nd December 2019

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